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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31402

Title: On the Flow Characteristics behind a Backward-facing Step and the Design of a New Axisymmetric Model for their Study
Authors: Rajasekaran, Jagannath
Advisor: Lavoie, Philippe
Department: Aerospace Science and Engineering
Keywords: separated shear flows
backward-facing step
Issue Date: 19-Dec-2011
Abstract: An extensive review was made to study the wake characteristics of a backward-facing step. Experimental and numerical studies of the backward-facing step suggest that the wake of a separated shear layer to be dependent on parameters such as: expansion ratio, aspect ratio, free stream turbulence intensity, boundary layer state and thickness at separation. The individual and combined effects of these parameters on the reattachment length are investigated and discussed in detail in this thesis. A new scaling parameter, sum of step height and boundary layer thickness at separation is proposed, which yields significant collapse of the available data. Based on the literature review, an axisymmetric model is designed for further investigating the dynamics of the flow independent of aforementioned parameters. Additionally, porous suction strips are incorporated to study the step wake characteristics independent of Reynolds number. This model has been built and will be tested extensively at UTIAS.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31402
Appears in Collections:Master

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