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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31404

Title: 3D Printing: Convergences, Frictions, Fluidity
Authors: Ree, Robert
Advisor: Ratto, Matthew
Department: Information Studies
Keywords: 3D printing
digital culture
material culture
design
craft
Makers
DIY
Critical Making
Issue Date: 19-Dec-2011
Abstract: The emergence of desktop ‘3D printing’ is not only a technological development, but equally a social and economic phenomenon that actively (and often contentiously) co-produces the material and ideological infrastructures it occupies. Reflecting wider momentum toward digital-material convergence, the current “revolution” in desktop digital fabrication is fundamentally attributable to the efforts of decentralized Maker and DIY communities who, connected through digital networks, practice citizen-led technological experimentation and occupy novel spaces for innovation and entrepreneurship. Employing hybrid qualitative methods that include Critical Making, this research explores the following themes: rhetoric versus reality, the divisive notion of ‘digital craft’, perceptions of authenticity, as well as cultural momentum manifested in decentralization, convergence, stratification, and iteration. An overarching theme emerges: 3D printing is a fluid phenomenon – in literal, metaphorical, technological and cultural ways.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31404
Appears in Collections:Master

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