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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31420

Title: Androgen Receptor Expression in Satellite Cells in the Levator Ani of the Rat
Authors: Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn
Advisor: Monks, D. Ashley
Department: Psychology
Keywords: Sexual differentiation
Spinal nucleus of bulbocavernosus
Satellite Cells
Androgen receptors
Levator Ani
Co-localization
Issue Date: 20-Dec-2011
Abstract: The sexual differentiation of the spinal nucleus of bulbocavernosus (SNB) and the bulbocavernosus (BC) and levator ani (LA) muscles that the SNB innervates, are masculinized by androgens acting on the BC/LA. The site of androgen receptors (AR) responsible for the masculinization of the neuromuscular system is not known. A potential site of action is satellite cells: proliferation of these cells is androgen-dependent and satellite cells seem to contribute to the size of the LA. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to co-localize satellite cells and AR within the LA of postnatal day one and three male and female rats. Results indicate that satellite cells express AR and reveal a difference in proportion of satellite cells expressing AR between the LA and control muscle. Interpretations of these findings, including whether the relatively small proportion of AR accounted for by satellite cells is enough to masculinize the SNB system, are discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31420
Appears in Collections:Master

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