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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31427

Title: Mild to Moderate Work-related Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pilot Study
Authors: Salehi, Sara
Advisor: Colantonio, Angela
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: mild Traumatic Brain injury
Return to work
Work-related Traumatic Brain injury
Issue Date: 20-Dec-2011
Abstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. This pilot study investigated demographic, clinical and environmental factors associated with return to work (RTW) among workers who sustained a mild to moderate work-related TBI (WrTBI). Using a retrospective cohort design, participants were recruited through an outpatient clinic dedicated to evaluating injured workers after a WrTBI. A mailed survey and medical record abstraction tool were used for data collection. Of the 40 injured workers who participated in this study, 19 reported working at time of follow-up. Those who were unable to RTW scored significantly lower on measures of emotional well-being; there were no significant between-group differences in cognitive or physical impairments. Gradual RTW and workplace accommodations were reported as key factors facilitating RTW. Our findings provide information that addresses improved rehabilitation and management of WrTBI as well as better education and support for employers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31427
Appears in Collections:Master

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