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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31465

Title: Association Studies of Personality Traits, Problem Gambling, and Serotonergic Gene Polymorphisms
Authors: Tong, Ryan
Advisor: Kennedy, James
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: Serotonergic Gene Polymorphisms
Genetics
Problem Gambling
Personality
Issue Date: 20-Dec-2011
Abstract: Problem gambling is the subclinical form of pathological gambling and both are characterized by difficulties in the limiting of money and time spent on gambling. Genetic and personality factors have been implicated in gambling disorders (PG). As PG is classified as an impulse-control disorder, the serotonin (5-HT) system has been suggested to be involved. We sought to better understand the complex relationship between personality traits, PG, and 5-HT genes. We investigated ten 5-HT candidate genes for association with PG and personality traits. We also examined personality traits for association with PG. We found that MAOA and HTR3A haplotypes were associated with Agreeableness and Conscientiousness personality domains, PG was associated with high Neuroticism and low Conscientiousness scores, and the MAOA gene may play a role in PG. Our findings contribute to the better understanding of how 5-HT genes may be involved in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying PG and personality.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31465
Appears in Collections:Master

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