test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31629

Title: The Role of RELA (p65) in Regulation of NF-kappaB Homeostasis: Implications for Atherosclerosis
Authors: Wasal, Karanvir
Advisor: Jongstra-Bilen, Jenny
Cybulsky, Myron
Department: Immunology
Keywords: Inflammation
Nuclear factor-kappaB
Gene expression
endothelial cells
Issue Date: 4-Jan-2012
Abstract: The NF-κB/Rel family of transcription factors and IκB inhibitors play a key role in regulation of gene expression in inflammation and immunity. Previous studies from our laboratory suggested that steady-state levels of p65 and other NF-κB components in the normal mouse aorta determine the magnitude of NF-κB target gene expression in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli, however, the mechanism(s) by which steady-state levels of NF-κB components are set is not clear. This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms behind NF-κB homeostasis and how that affects atherosclerosis susceptibility. In HeLa cells and HUVEC, siRNA silencing of p65 correlated with reduced steady-state expression of a subset of NF-κB/Rel and IκB genes at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, respectively, in addition to reducing TNFα-induced NF-κB/Rel and IκB gene expression. This correlation was also observed in atherosclerosis-susceptible mouse aortic endothelium suggesting the role of p65 in modulating NF-κB homeostasis and affecting atherosclerosis susceptibility.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31629
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Wasal_Karanvir_S_201111_MSc_thesis.pdf1.39 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft