test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Information Policy Research Program (IPRP) >
CRACIN >
CRACIN Working Papers Series >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32135

Title: Sharing Wireless Internet in Urban Neighbourhoods
Authors: Wong, Matt
Clement, Andrew
Keywords: WiFi
Toronto
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: Canadian Research Alliance for Community Innovation and Networking
Citation: Wong, Matt, & Andrew Clement (2007) "Sharing Wireless Internet in Urban Neighbourhoods," CRACIN Working Paper No. 19, January 2007 Toronto: Canadian Research Alliance for Community Innovation and Networking.
Series/Report no.: CRACIN Working Paper
19
Abstract: With the development and commercialization of wireless (‘WiFi’) technology for home Internet use in the last several years, the opportunity for users to share Internet access easily with one another has become possible. While this sharing began informally, even surreptitiously, it has recently become widespread and more formal with prominent announcements of city-wide wireless network deployments. However, while there are many benefits claimed for these services, such as broader coverage, improved access and lowered cost, relatively little is known about how people regard sharing wireless Internet services. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, this research investigated the range of attitudes towards such sharing among urban wireless users. Our research revealed generally positive feelings about the benefits of sharing, especially when using others’ signals, but serious reservations about making their own signals open for use by strangers. These findings have implications for developing both community-wide infrastructure as well as local, ad-hoc systems. They also provide the basis for several design features that would promote sharing, including security measures, privacy protection, cost reduction, bandwidth prioritization and reciprocal notification.
Description: Also presented at the 3rd International Conference on Communities and Technologies, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, June 28-30, 2007.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32135
Appears in Collections:CRACIN Working Papers Series

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
CRACIN Working Paper No 19.pdf654.23 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft