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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32258

Title: Trapping and Removal of Bubbles in a Microfluidic Format
Authors: Lochovsky, Conrad
Advisor: Guenther, Axel
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: microfluidic
bubble trap
bubbles
trap
Issue Date: 21-Mar-2012
Abstract: Unwanted gas bubbles are a challenge for microfluidic-based systems, as adherence to channel networks can disrupt fluid delivery. This is especially true for devices with biological applications, as the presence of a single bubble creates thin fluid films with extremely high shear stresses, which can damage biological samples. Current strategies to remove bubbles require complicated fabrication or off-chip components. This thesis describes an on-chip microfluidic strategy utilizing permeation for in-plane trapping and removal of occasional gas bubbles. The trap was demonstrated with nitrogen bubbles, which were consistently removed at a rate of 0.14 µL/min for a single trap, and shown to have long-term operation capability by removing approximately 4,000 bubbles during one day without failure. The trap was integrated with a microfluidic system for the study of small blood vessels. Experiments were complemented with analytical and numerical models to characterize the bubble removal process.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32258
Appears in Collections:Master

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