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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32353

Title: Contesting Space and Power through Digital Drama Research: Colonial Histories, Postcolonial Interrogations
Authors: Gallagher, Kathleen
Kim, Isabelle
Keywords: digital video
aesthetics
postcolonial methodologies’ collaborative youth research
Issue Date: Mar-2007
Publisher: University of the West Indies
Citation: Gallagher, K., & Kim, I. (2007). Contesting space and power through digital drama research: Colonial histories, postcolonial interrogations. Caribbean Quarterly, 53(1&2), 115-126.
Abstract: This article addresses the question of contemporary research relationships mediated through digital methodologies that carry the weight of colonial histories of contact. Using an ethnographic case of four urban high schools, in Toronto, Canada and New York City, USA, the article attempts to rethink established aesthetics and politics assigned to the camera’s eye in order to respond to some of the methodological and epistemological dilemmas encountered in such forms of research and representations of subjects. The article ends with some practical considerations for the possibilities of collaborative, multi-perspectival digital video in post-positivist qualitative research.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32353
ISSN: 0008-6495
Appears in Collections:Faculty (CTL)

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