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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32420

Title: “Disgusting” Fat Bodies & Young Lebanese-Canadian Women’s Discursive Constructions of Health
Authors: Abou-Rizk, Zeina
Rail, Geneviève
Keywords: HEALTH
DISCOURSE
OBESITY
FAT
WOMEN
LEBANESE
BODY
BEAUTY
CULTURE
IDENTITY
Issue Date: May-2012
Publisher: UTSC Printing Services, University of Toronto Scarborough
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life, Vol 11 (1), pg 94-123
Abstract: Using feminist poststructuralist and postcolonial lenses, we investigate how young Lebanese-Canadian women discursively construct health in the current context of a dominant obesity discourse. Participant-centered conversations on the topic of health were conducted with 20 young Lebanese- Canadian women. Results attest that the participants construct health as a matter of physical appearance and more specifically on the basis of being “not fat.” While doing so, they generally show disgust for overweight and obese bodies although some participants express compassion as they see obesity as a deterrent to health and a serious “disease.” Our results address the language used by participants to construct their multiple and shifting subjectivities as they speak about health. We reflect on such language and the impact of diasporic spaces on young women’s changing and complex subject positions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32420
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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