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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32464

Title: Clinical and Spatiotemporal Aspects of Gait: A Secondary Analysis of the Walking Characteristics of Subjects with Sub-acute Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury
Authors: Guy, Kristina
Advisor: Verrier, Molly
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: spinal cord injury
walking
sub-acute
spatiotemporal
Issue Date: 19-Jul-2012
Abstract: Objective: To describe the walking characteristics of a sample of ambulatory subjects with sub-acute incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Methods: 52 subjects were included in a secondary analysis of clinical and spatiotemporal measures of walking. The study sample was described as a whole and subsequently divided into subgroups on the basis of 3 clinical factors (etiology, severity, and neurological level of injury) and 4 gait factors (gait aid, velocity, symmetry, and variability). Results: Clinical and spatiotemporal parameters were highly variable across the study population. Sub–groups with unique gait features were best identified by velocity and variability. Conclusions: Spatiotemporal measures of walking provide augmented description of walking in the sub-acute iSCI population. Sub-grouping by gait factors warrants further investigation with respect to their ability to act as predictors and modifiers of treatment effect.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32464
Appears in Collections:Master

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