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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32524

Title: Determinants of Adaptation and their Interactions in Experimental Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Authors: Bartfai, David
Advisor: Anderson, James
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: adaptation
evolution
yeast
cerevisiae
speciation
Issue Date: 24-Jul-2012
Abstract: The goal of my M.Sc. thesis research was to investigate the link between divergent adaptation and reproductive isolation in speciation, the process by which one species becomes two over time. Previous studies followed the evolution of 12 replicate experimental populations of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in either of two non-optimal environments, high-salt or low-glucose, over 500 generations. In this research, I re-sequenced the whole genomes of six diploid strains of these populations, three from high salt and three from low glucose. Among the replicates, there was remarkable degree of parallelism in the underlying determinants of adaptation including multiple mutations in PMA1, encoding the main proton exporter, in high-salt and in several genes in the ras signalling pathway in both environments. A variety of positive and negative epistatic interactions were found among mutations from within and among populations, emphasizing the importance of epistasis in adaptation and potentially in speciation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32524
Appears in Collections:Master

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