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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32569

Title: Maternal Dietary Restriction and the Effects of Postweaning Nutrition on Fetal Development, Insulin Signalling, Glucose Metabolism and Body Composition In C57BL/6J Mice
Authors: Chun, Lauren
Advisor: Lye, Stephen J.
Department: Physiology
Keywords: metabolic syndrome
maternal undernutrition
omega-3 fatty acids
intervention
Issue Date: 25-Jul-2012
Abstract: Mice (C57BL/6J: B6) exposed to maternal dietary restriction (DR) exhibited fetal growth- restriction and as adults develop symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. We aimed to determine the impact of DR on fetal hepatic gluconeogenic pathway and insulin sensitivity in late gestation. Second, we aimed to determine whether a postweaning diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids would alter the development of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and obesity in DR male offspring. The reduced rate of fetal glycogen synthesis by DR male offspring and altered hepatic gene expression of enzymes involved in insulin signalling and glucose metabolism suggest abnormal fetal development in response to DR that may contribute to the later development of the metabolic syndrome. The postweaning omega-3 diet improved obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in both DR and control males. These data suggest that nutrition in pregnancy and postnatal life play important roles in determining life-long metabolic health.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32569
Appears in Collections:Master

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