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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32574

Title: Factors Influencing Ecological Metrics of Thermal Response in North American Freshwater Fish
Authors: Hasnain, Sarah
Advisor: Shuter, Brian
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Keywords: Thermal Ecology
Freshwater fish
Issue Date: 25-Jul-2012
Abstract: Habitat temperature is a major determinant of performance and activity in fish. I examined the relationships between thermal response metrics describing growth (optimal growth temperature [OGT] and final temperature preferendum [FTP]), survival (upper incipient lethal temperature [UILT] and critical thermal maximum [CTMax]), and reproduction (optimum spawning [OS] and optimum egg development temperature [OE]) for 173 North American freshwater fish species. All metrics were highly correlated and associated with thermal preference class, reproductive guild and spawning season. Controlling for phylogeny resulted in an overall decrease in correlation strength, varying with metric pair relationship. ANCOVA and Bayesian hierarchical models were utilized to assess the influence of phylogeny on metric pair relationships. For both methods, FTP based metric pairs were weakly correlated within taxonomic family. Strong within family associations were found for reproduction metrics OS-OE. These results suggest that evolutionary history plays an important role in determining species thermal response to their environment.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32574
Appears in Collections:Master

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