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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32577

Title: Nutrient and Biomass Contributions of Downed Woody Debris in Boreal Mixedwood Forests of Northeastern Ontario
Authors: Iraci, Jessica
Advisor: Malcolm, Jay R.
Morris, Dave
Department: Forestry
Keywords: Biomass and nutrient pools
Downed woody debris
Doreal mixedwoods
Wood decay patterns
Issue Date: 25-Jul-2012
Abstract: Harvest-related decreases of downed woody debris (DWD) in forests may have important ecological implications; however, patterns of nutrient release from decaying DWD are poorly understood. The importance of DWD was investigated relative to biomass and nutrient pools in six, second-growth boreal mixedwood forest stands, differing by harvest regime near Kapuskasing, Ontario. Nutrient concentrations and mineralization trends using ion exchange resins at three proximities during the decay of Abies balsamea and Populus tremuloides were also examined. Concentrations of N, P, Ca, and Mg increased with decay, whereas K decreased. DWD was a minor contributor to biomass and nutrient pools. Inorganic N, P, Ca, and Mn were significant between harvest types with decay class interaction for N, Ca, and Mn. Species and proximity effects were found for Al, Fe, and K. These results suggest DWD may be a minor contributor to biomass and nutrient pools, but highlights its dynamic nature.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32577
Appears in Collections:Master

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