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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32587

Title: Effects of Moderate-intensity Aerobic Cycling and Swim Exercise on Post-exertional Blood Pressure in Healthy, Young Men and Women
Authors: Lakin, Robert
Advisor: Goodman, Jack
Department: Exercise Sciences
Keywords: blood pressure
swimming
cycling
exercise
post-exercise hypotension
Issue Date: 26-Jul-2012
Abstract: Aerobic exercise such as cycling is known to elicit a post-exercise hypotensive (PEH) response. However, it is not known if swim exercise produces a similar effect in normotensive individuals. We tested the hypothesis that an acute bout of swimming would elicit a PEH response that is less compared to an equivalent bout of cycling. 10 trained and 11 untrained normotensive (SBP/DBP < 120/80 mmHg) individuals (23±1 years) underwent 30 min intensity-matched cycling and swimming sessions to assess changes in BP and cardiovascular responses. While PEH was similar between modalities within groups, the magnitude and temporality of change in BP following swimming was significantly different (p < 0.01) between groups, with untrained participants showing a significant PEH response. Attenuation of PEH in trained individuals was reflective of a significant increase in sympathetic outflow and slower vagal reactivation, suggesting training in an aquatic environment leads to alterations in post-exercise BP regulatory mechanisms.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32587
Appears in Collections:Master

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