test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32607

Title: MAX-DOAS Measurements of Nitrogen Dioxide and Aerosol
Authors: Mendolia, Deanna
Advisor: Evans, Greg J.
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy
MAX-DOAS
tropospheric nitrogen dioxide and aerosol
vertical pollutant profiles
aerosol optical properties
Issue Date: 2-Aug-2012
Abstract: Multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) was applied to retrieve tropospheric NO2 and aerosol vertical profiles from downtown Toronto, and King City, Ontario during select periods in 2006 – 2010. Linear regression of MAX-DOAS NO2 vertical column density (VCD) versus OMI (satellite) VCD yielded a good correlation (R = 0.88) and MAX-DOAS negative bias of 20%, which was within the reported uncertainty of the MAX-DOAS and OMI VCD. The average regional Toronto VCD (remotely-sensed via MAX-DOAS and OMI) was half of the near-road VCD obtained in-situ (2.4 x 1016 ± 1.2 x 1016 molec/cm2). MAX-DOAS measurements of O4 were coupled with radiative transfer modeling to obtain vertical aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A strong linear agreement was observed between PM2.5 concentration and aerosol extinction coefficient (R = 0.92), and MAX-DOAS versus sun photometer AOD (slope = 0.94; R= 0.90).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32607
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Mendolia_Deanna_201206_MASc_thesis.pdf.pdf3.68 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft