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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32622

Title: Regulation of the Timing of Puberty: Exploration of the Role of Epigenetics
Authors: Rzeczkowska, Paulina Agnieszka
Advisor: Palmert, Mark R.
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: puberty
epigenetics
DNA methylation
histone acetylation
C57BL/6 female mice
histone deacetylase inhibitor
methyl-donor
microarray
growth
Hoxa11
variation in complex traits
epigenome wide association study
L-methioine
suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid
Issue Date: 16-Aug-2012
Abstract: Pubertal timing displays wide, normally distributed variation in a healthy population of sexually maturing adolescents. However, like many complex traits, factors contributing to the variation are not well understood. Epigenetic regulation may contribute to some of the population variation. The role that epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation and histone acetylation, may play in regulating pubertal timing was investigated in C57BL/6 female mice: investigating whether population variation in pubertal timing among inbred mice could be explained by environmental factors; whether perturbing the epigenome using a histone deacetylase inhibitor or methyl-donor would alter pubertal timing; and examining genome-wide methylation patterns in hypothalami of early versus late maturing mice. Results demonstrate that measurable micro-environmental factors have only negligible effects on pubertal timing; pubertal timing was significantly altered by administration of epigenetic modifying agents; differences in methylation patterns are subtle. This initial evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating pubertal timing.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32622
Appears in Collections:Master

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