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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32914

Title: Chinese Enough For Ya? Disrupting and Transforming Notions of Chineseness through Chinesenough Tattoos
Authors: Chan, Karen Bic Kwun
Advisor: Titchkosky, Tanya
Department: Sociology and Equity Studies in Education
Keywords: Authenticity
Hybridity
Chineseness
Chinese
Chinese Tattoos
Tattooing
Body Modification
Flash Art
Arts Informed Inquiry
Arts Informed Research
Whiteness
Hanzi
Kanji
Diasporic Studies
Interpretive Social Inquiry
Carnivlesque
Cultural Appropriation
Chinese Canadian
Social space
Subtitling
Sense Experience
Absent Body
Third Space
Anti-fashion
Asian Studies
Asian American Studies
Asian Canadian Studies
Cultural Studies
Visual Culture
Phenomenology
Issue Date: 31-Aug-2012
Abstract: Using interpretive methods of social inquiry, this thesis explores the socio-political significance of body tattoos made of Chinese-like text, which have recently become popular Western phenomena. It theorizes how contemporary Western tattooing complicates bodily and social boundaries, providing context to interrogate ideas of authenticity. Coining the term "Chinesenough" (from “Chinese” and “enough”), I describe how many such tattoos do not reflect in Chinese what many wearers and viewers assume they do. I contrast how Chinesenough tattoos (re)produce whiteness to the multiple and contradictory Chinesenesses that are also (re)produced. Reading Chinesenough flash art on tattoo studio walls as objects constituting social space, I consider the social meaning of their English subtitles and manner of organization. I theorize the body’s absence from Chinesenough flash art while articulating my body’s sense experience of encountering the same. Finally, I produce and theorize five illustrations that carnivalize Chinesenough iconography to disrupt and transform the phenomenon.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32914
Appears in Collections:Master

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