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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32980

Title: Pressure profile similarities between tongue resistance training tasks and liquid swallows
Authors: Steele, Catriona M
Bailey, Gemma L
Molfenter, Sonja M
Yeates, Erin M
Grace-Martin, Karen
Keywords: Dysphagia
Exercise
oral-motor
pressure
rehabilitation
resistance
swallowing
tongue
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Abstract: Tongue-pressure resistance training is known to increase tongue strength in seniors and individuals with stroke-related dysphagia. However, evidence of associated functional improvements in swallowing is equivocal. We investigated similarities in pressure waveform profiles between swallowing and several of tongue-palate pressure tasks to identify tasks that may be best-suited for inclusion in tongue-pressure resistance training protocols for patients who are unable to safely perform real bolus swallows in treatment. Tongue-palate pressures were recorded in twenty healthy, young adults. Participants performed water and nectar-thick juice swallows, effortful and non-effortful saliva swallows, and “half-maximum” tongue-palate partial-pressure tasks emphasizing either anterior or posterior tongue-palate contact at different speeds. Pressure slopes (amplitude change over time) during the pressure application (rise) and withdrawal (release) phases were analyzed. A subset of four tasks with the greatest similarity in slope characteristics to those seen in bolus swallows was identified: anterior half-maximum tongue-presses; posterior maximum tongue-presses; posterior half-maximum slow tongue presses; and effortful saliva swallows. We propose that future research should explore the degree to which swallowing improvements are obtained from treatment protocols that emphasize these tasks.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32980
Appears in Collections:Toronto Rehab Publications

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JRRD Final Submission Tongue Pressure Profiles Manuscript April 7 2010.pdf291.88 kBAdobe PDF
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