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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33129

Title: Brief exposures: Male sexual orientation is accurately perceived at 50-ms
Authors: Rule, Nicholas O.
Ambady, Nalini
Keywords: person perception
accuracy
social cognition
sexual orientation
nonverbal behavior
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Rule, N. O., & Ambady, N. (2008). Brief exposures: Male sexual orientation is accurately perceived at 50-ms. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 1100-1105.
Abstract: People have proved adept at categorizing others into social categories, at least when the categorical distinction is perceptually obvious (e.g., age, race, or gender). There remain many social groups whose boundaries are less clear, however. The current work therefore tested judgments of an ambiguous social category (male sexual orientation) from faces shown for durations between 33 ms and 10,000 ms. The sexual orientation of faces presented for 50 ms, 100 ms, 6500 ms, 10,000 ms, and at a self-paced rate (averaging 1500 ms), was categorized at above-chance levels with no decrease in accuracy for briefer exposures. Previous work showing impression formation at similar speeds relied on consensus to determine the validity of judgments. The present results extend these findings by providing a criterion for judg- mental accuracy—actual group membership.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33129
Appears in Collections:UofT Faculty publications

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