test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
UofT faculty publications >
UofT Faculty publications >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33142

Title: First impressions of the face: Predicting success and behavior
Authors: Rule, Nicholas O.
Ambady, Nalini
Keywords: first impressions
face perception
accuracy
leadership
politics
business
personality
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: Blackwell
Citation: Rule, N. O., & Ambady, N. (2010). First impressions of the face: Predicting success and behavior. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 4, 506-516.
Abstract: The human tendency to form impressions of others is ubiquitous and consequential. Consensus, or agreement among individuals, regarding their first impressions based on the facial appearance of others can lead to the treatment of other individuals in particular ways that shape their outcomes and behaviors. For an impression to be considered accurate it must not only be consensual but must also show correspondence to an external criterion, such as whether impressions of individu- als’ leadership ability are related to the performance of their group or organization. Many of our first impressions may not have valid external criteria to enable an assessment of the accuracy of the impression. Yet, whether our impressions are accurate or merely consensual, they can still often predict important outcomes. A limited but growing literature has shown that our impressions can be both consensual and predictive despite important social and perceptual distinctions, such as differences in culture.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33142
Appears in Collections:UofT Faculty publications

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Rule&Ambady(2010_SPPC).pdf93.64 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft