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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33150

Title: Gay, straight, or somewhere in between: Accuracy and bias in the perception of bisexual faces
Authors: Ding, Jonathan Y. C.
Rule, Nicholas O.
Keywords: person perception
sexual orientation
nonverbal behavior
social cognition
bisexuality
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Ding, J. Y. C., & Rule, N. O. (2012). Gay, straight, or somewhere in between: Accuracy and bias in the perception of bisexual faces. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 36, 165-176.
Abstract: Sexual orientation can be accurately identified from photos of faces, but pre- vious work has focused exclusively on straight versus gay and lesbian individuals. Across three studies, the current work investigated the facial perception of bisexual men and women, a less socially salient category. Although participants could identify straight and gay men at above-chance levels in a trichotomous categorization task, bisexual men were categorized only at chance (Study 1). Participants perceived bisexual men to be signifi- cantly different from straight men, but not gay men (Study 2). Similarly, whereas bisexual and lesbian women were not rated differently, both groups were distinguishable from straight female targets (Study 3). These findings suggest a straight-non straight dichotomy in the categorization of sexual orientation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33150
Appears in Collections:UofT Faculty publications

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