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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33192

Title: Face value: Amygdala response reflects the validity of first impressions
Authors: Rule, Nicholas O.
Moran, Joseph M.
Freeman, Jonathan B.
Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan
Gabrieli, John D. E.
Ambady, Nalini
Keywords: first impressions
face perception
nonverbal behavior
amygdala
leadership
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Rule, N. O., Moran, J. M., Freeman, J. B., Whitfield-Gabrieli, S., Gabrieli, J. D. E., & Ambady, N. (2011). Face value: Amygdala response reflects the validity of first impressions. NeuroImage, 54, 734-741.
Abstract: The human amygdala responds to fi rst impressions of people as judged from their faces, such as normative judgments about the trustworthiness of strangers. It is unknown, however, whether amygdala responses to fi rst impressions can be validated by objective criteria. Here, we examined amygdala responses to faces of Chief Executive Of fi cers (CEOs) where real-world outcomes could be measured objectively by the amounts of pro fi ts made by each CEO's company. During fMRI scanning, participants made incidental judgments about the symmetry of each CEO's face. After scanning, participants rated each CEO's face on leadership ability. Parametric analyses showed that greater left amygdala response to the CEOs' faces was associated with higher post-scan ratings of the CEOs' leadership ability. In addition, greater left amygdala response was also associated with greater pro fi ts made by the CEOs' companies and this relationship was statistically mediated by external raters' perceptions of arousal. Thus, amygdala response reflected both subjective judgments and objective measures of leadership ability based on first impressions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33192
Appears in Collections:UofT Faculty publications

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