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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33200

Title: Learning Land and Life: An Institutional Ethnography of Land Use Planning and Development in a Northern Ontario First Nation
Authors: Gruner, Sheila
Advisor: Mojab, Shahrzad
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: Institutional Ethnography
First Nation
Mushkego
Mushkegowuk
Ininowuk
Swampy Cree
Fort Albany
Peetabego
Historical Materialism
Dialectical
Community-Based Research
Participatory Research
Nature
Ecology
Ecological
Environmental
Ruling Relations
Abstraction
Land use planning
Development
Protection
Far North Act
Bill 191
Critical Education
Ideology
Land Relations
Indigenous
Aboriginal
Northern Ontario
Learning
Capitalism
Social Relations
Consciousness
Everyday life practice
Issue Date: 16-Nov-2012
Abstract: This study examines intricately related questions of consciousness and learning, textually-mediated social coordination, and human relationships within nature, anchored in the everyday life practices and concerns of a remote First Nation community in the Treaty 9 region. Through the use of Institutional Ethnography, community-based research and narrative methods, the research traces how the ruling relations of land use planning unfold within the contemporary period of neoliberal development in Northern Ontario. People’s everyday experiences and access to land in the Mushkego Inninowuk (Swampy Cree) community of Fort Albany for example, are shaped in ways that become oriented to provincial ruling relations, while people also reorient these relations on their own terms through the activities of a community research project and through historically advanced Indigenous ways of being. The study examines the coordinating effects of provincially-driven land use planning on communities and territories in Treaty 9, as people in local sites are coordinated to others elsewhere in a complex process that serves to produce the legislative process called Bill 191 or the Far North Act. Examining texts, ideology and dialectical historical materialist relations, the study is an involved inquiry into the text process itself and how it comes to be put together. The textually mediated and institutional forms of organizing social relations—effectively land relations—unfold with the involvement of people from specific sites and social locations whose work is coordinated, as it centres on environmental protection and development in the region north of the 51st parallel. A critique of the textually mediated institutional process provides a rich site for exploring learning within the context of neoliberal capitalist relations and serves to illuminate ways in which people can better act to change the problematic relations that haunt settler-Indigenous history in the contemporary period. The work asks all people involved in the North how we can work to address historic injustices rooted in the relations and practices of accumulation and dispossession. The voices and modes of governance of Aboriginal people, obfuscated within the processes and relations of provincial planning, must be afforded the space and recognition to flourish on their own terms.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33200
Appears in Collections:Doctoral

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