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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33240

Title: Hydrological Controls on Mercury Mobility and Transport from a Forested Hillslope during Spring Snowmelt
Authors: Haynes, Kristine
Advisor: Mitchell, Carl
Department: Geography
Keywords: hydrology
biogeochemistry
mercury
transport
spring snowmelt
hillslope
upland soils
dissolved organic carbon
isotope tracer
Issue Date: 20-Nov-2012
Abstract: Upland environments are important sources of mercury (Hg) to downstream wetlands and water bodies. Hydrology is instrumental in facilitating Hg transport within, and export from watersheds. Two complementary studies were conducted to assess the role hydrological processes play in controlling Hg mobility and transport in forested uplands. A field study compared runoff and Hg fluxes from three, replicate hillslope plots during two contrasting spring snowmelt periods, in terms of snowpack depth and timing. Hillslope Hg fluxes were predominately flow-driven. The melting of soil frost significantly delayed a large portion of the Hg flux later into the spring following a winter with minimal snow accumulation. A microcosm laboratory study using a stable Hg isotope tracer applied to intact soil cores investigated the relative controls of soil moisture and precipitation on Hg mobility. Both hydrologic factors control the mobility of contemporary Hg; with greatest Hg flushing from dry soils under high-flow conditions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33240
Appears in Collections:Master

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