test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33301

Title: Ubiquitous Reactivation and Targeted Preservation of MeCP2 Expression in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome
Authors: Lang, Min
Advisor: Eubanks, James
Department: Physiology
Keywords: Rett syndrome
MeCP2
behaviour
electroencephalography
catecholamine
thermoregulation
daily rhythmic activity
Issue Date: 20-Nov-2012
Abstract: Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is predominately caused by mutations of the MECP2 gene. As neuronal apoptosis is not observed in RTT patients and MeCP2-deficient mice, the neurological deficits may be reversible. To address this, we reactivated MeCP2 expression ubiquitously in MeCP2-deficient mice after symptom onset. Our results showed that life span, behavioural performances, EEG activity, thermoregulation, and daily rhythmic activity were significantly improved after MeCP2 reactivation. Furthermore, the extent of improvement was dependent upon the efficiency of MeCP2 reactivation. To assess the role of the catecholaminergic system in Rett syndrome pathophysiology, we selectively preserved MeCP2 function within tyrosine hydroxylase expressing cells. We observed a significant improvement in the life span of male rescue mice and reduced sudden unexplained death rates in female rescue mice. Behavioural performances and EEG patterns were also significantly improved.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33301
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Lang_Min_201211_MSc_Thesis.pdf3.9 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft