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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33406

Title: Short-term High-intensity Interval Training and Continuous Moderate-intensity Training Improve Peak Aerobic Capacity and Diastolic Filling during Exercise
Authors: Esfandiari, Sam
Advisor: Goodman, Jack
Department: Exercise Sciences
Keywords: left ventricle
endurance training
high-intensity interval training
echocardiography
Issue Date: 22-Nov-2012
Abstract: This study examined the effects of short-term high-intensity interval training (HIT) and continuous moderate-intensity training (CMT) on left ventricular (LV) function in young, healthy men. Sixteen untrained men were randomly assigned to HIT (8-12 X 60:75 seconds cycling at 95-100%:10% V˙O2peak) and CMT (90-120 minutes cycling at 65% V˙O2peak) and assessed before and after six sessions of training. LV function was determined at rest and during submaximal exercise using two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. HIT and CMT improved V˙O2peak and induced plasma volume expansion to a similar magnitude. Although resting LV function did not change, increased exercise stroke volume and cardiac output was observed, secondary to increases in end-diastolic volume. Numerous ECHO-derived indices of diastolic performance were similarly enhanced during exercise in both groups. Short-term HIT and CMT elicit rapid increases in V˙O2peak and LV filling without global changes in systolic performance or cardiac morphology at rest.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33406
Appears in Collections:Master

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