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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33411

Title: Childhood Fracture Begets Childhood Fracture: A Population-based Study of Longitudinal Fracture Patterns in Ontario Children
Authors: Escott, Benjamin
Advisor: Howard, Andrew
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: fracture
pediatric
Issue Date: 22-Nov-2012
Abstract: Objectives: The objectives of this study were two-fold: (1) to describe the epidemiology of childhood fractures in Ontario; (2) to determine if having a fracture in childhood is associated with an increased risk of having a future fracture. Methods: This was a population-based retrospective cohort study using Ontario health administration data. Children aged 0 to 15 years were grouped according to baseline fracture status. Associations between predictors and future fracture were assessed using Poisson and Cox PH regression. Results: 43,154 Ontario children experienced a baseline fracture (17.5 per 1000 child years). Children with a baseline fracture had a 60% higher rate of fracture during 7 years of follow-up after adjustment for sex, rurality, history of previous fracture and the occurrence of head injury and soft-tissue injury. Conclusions: The occurrence of a baseline fracture is associated with an increased rate of future fracture irrespective of age at time of baseline fracture.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33411
Appears in Collections:Master

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