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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33537

Title: Mechanical Transformation to Support Design for Environmentally Significant Behaviour
Authors: Son, Jungik
Advisor: Shu, Lily H.
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: Design for environment
product design
transformation principles
environmentally significant behaviour
Issue Date: 27-Nov-2012
Abstract: This thesis aims to discover possibilities of using products that mechanically transform to support environmentally significant behaviour (ESB), a term that refers to intentional behaviour of an individual to change the natural world. The first half of the work explored the potential relationship between mechanical transformation principles and certain ESBs. This exploration found that implementing transformative mechanisms in products enabled spontaneous use of the products in unanticipated situations. For example, a collapsible reusable shopping bag helped users avoid purchasing disposable bags when they went to grocery stores impulsively. The second half studied a variety of organisms to identify transformation patterns in nature. These patterns were summarized in a two-dimensional matrix to facilitate conceptual design of transformable products. In summary, this work showed that mechanical transformation facilitates at least three types of ESB, and also developed a new tool to assist designers in developing conceptual transformable products that can support ESBs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33537
Appears in Collections:Master

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