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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33581

Title: Songs that Touch our Soul - A Comparative Study of Folk Songs in two Chinese Classics: Shijing and Han Yuefu
Authors: Wang, Yumei
Advisor: Sanders, Graham
Department: East Asian Studies
Keywords: Shijing
Han Yuefu
Issue Date: 27-Nov-2012
Abstract: The subject of my thesis is the comparative study of classical Chinese folk songs. Based on Jeffrey Wainwright, George Lansing Raymond, and Liu Xie’s theories, this study was conducted from four perspectives: theme, content, prosody structure and aesthetic features. The purposes of my thesis are to trace the originality of 160 folk songs in Shijing and 47 folk songs in Han yuefu, to illuminate the origin of Chinese folk songs and to demonstrate the secularism reflected in Chinese folk songs. My research makes contribution to the following four areas: it explores the relation between folk songs in Shijing and Han yuefu and compares the similarities and differences between them; it reveals the poetic kinship between Shijing and Han yuefu; it evaluates the significance of the common people’s compositions; and it displays the unique artistic value and cultural influence of Chinese early folk songs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33581
Appears in Collections:Master

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