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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33917

Title: Traditional Midwives in Tamaulipas: The Difficult Negotiation Between Traditional Child-birth Knowledge & the Biomedical System in Mexico
Authors: Torri, Maria Constanza
Keywords: BIRTH
MIDWIVES
MEXICO
MEDICAL PLURALISM
Issue Date: Dec-2012
Publisher: UTSC Printing Services, University of Toronto Scarborough
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life, Vol 11 (2), pg 42-63.
Abstract: Since the 1970’s, the government in Mexico has started encouraging medical staff to work closely with traditional midwives by using training programs. As a consequence, midwifery identity and practice in Mexico is constantly being transformed. This negotiation process is not easy, as the focus of the majority of the training programs for midwives is to change midwifery practice. The article analyzes biomedical and local practices of midwives in Tamaulipas, Mexico, with respect to training programs. The way in which training programs have possibly changed the perceptions of traditional midwifery identity and the negotiation between traditional midwifery practices and biomedicine will also be examined. The paper concludes by presenting the challenges represented by the creation of a model of intercultural health and the utilization of traditional medical resources within the national health system.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33917
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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