test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
University of Toronto at Scarborough >
Social Sciences >
Social Sciences >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33918

Title: Male Circumcision: Sharpening the Phallus, Constructing Masculinities, Some Implications for Men & Women
Authors: Sev'er, Aysan
Keywords: MALE CIRCUMCISION
MASCULINITIES
HYPER-MASCULINITIES
GENDER ORDERS
VIOLENCE
Issue Date: Dec-2012
Publisher: UTSC Printing Services, University of Toronto Scarborough
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life, Vol 11 (2), pg 64-87.
Abstract: Historically, justifications for male circumcision (MC) has widely varied. Some of the purported justifications for MC include religious obligation, spiritual enlightenment, mastery over sciences, avoidance of masturbation and fornification, cleanliness and avoidance of STDs. In the current paper, I go beyond the discussion of the historical reasons given for MC. Instead, I emphasize the gendered aspects of MC rituals as they contribute to masculinity and hypermasculinity. The theoretical lens I use in my analysis is informed by Bourdieu (1992; 2001), and other feminist thought. I emphasize the rank ordering, male power and supremacy aspects embedded in most ritualized practices of MC, regardless of the historical or the geographical location they may have been practiced at. I also emphasize the near universal practice of women’s symbolical or physical segregation from the rituals. In terms of the hypermasculinization aspects of some MC practices, the differentiating component is the cyclical presence of violence, often before, during and following MC. Violence aspects are discussed in relation to examples from pre- monotheistic as well as some early monotheistic cultural practices. I also provide recent examples from the Xhosa practices, and explore the negative consequences of hypermasculinization aspects of MC rituals for men and for women.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33918
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
11.2.Sev’er.pdf273.85 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft