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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4317

Title: Buddhist stories for transition in a strange land (keynote presentation)
Authors: Sugunasiri, Suwanda H.J.
Keywords: Buddhism
Buddhism and health
Buddhism and healing
Buddhist psychology
Buddhism and science
Buddhist meditation
meditation as healing
mindfulness meditation
the Buddha as healer
healing paradigms
Buddhism and pastoral care
pastoral care and meditation
Issue Date: 24-Aug-1995
Citation: Keynote presentation at the Fifth International Congress on Pastoral Care and Counselling, University of Toronto, Aug. 24, 1995
Abstract: This paper is a keynote presentation for a conference on pastoral care and counselling. The author uses story-telling to present Buddhism as a religion whose basic philosophy is to recognize suffering and provide a healing path to self-awareness. He discusses the Buddha in his role as 'the Great Physician' and meditation as the process for self-healing, writing that "what a Buddhist would offer as the primary tool in pastoral care would be meditation." (p. 16). The author concludes by demonstrating meditation as mind-cultivation to care-givers so that they may better help others.
Description: Copyright belongs to the author. Permission to reproduce this work has been obtained.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4317
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Divinity

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