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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/453

Title: Poor health, lone-mothers and welfare reform: competing visions of employability
Authors: Baker, Maureen
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: Pristine Publications
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal 1(2):4-25.
Abstract: Welfare-to-work research has revealed many constraints for beneficiaries attempting to leave social benefits to survive on employment income, including low confidence levels, dead-end jobs, low pay, unfavourable tax rates and childcare problems. Little is known about health-related constraints even though researchers have long been aware of the correlation between low income and poor health. This article is derived from a New Zealand project examining the health of lone-mothers on welfare and how health and other factors affect their ability to engage in paid-work. Stories from 120 interviews with work-tested sole-mothers illustrate their concerns when they are expected to find paid-work despite having sick children, poor health of their own, multiple family problems and depression. These stories, which coincide with research in other countries, are contrasted with neoliberal welfare policy, suggesting competing visions of employability. As all ‘liberal’ welfare regimes are restructuring in similar ways, this project is relevant to other nations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/453
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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