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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Journal of Medical Internet Research >
Volume 5 (2003) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4652


Title: LASIK Complications and the Internet: Is the Public being Mislead?
Authors: Fahey, Daragh Kennedy
Weinberg, Julius
Keywords: Original Paper
Keratomileusis, laser in situ
LASIK
postoperative complications
Internet
public
Issue Date: 31-Mar-2003
Publisher: Gunther Eysenbach; Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, Toronto, Canada
Citation: Daragh Kennedy Fahey, Julius Weinberg. LASIK Complications and the Internet: Is the Public being Mislead?. J Med Internet Res 2003;5(1):e2 <URL: http://www.jmir.org/2003/1/e2/>
Abstract: [This item is a preserved copy and is not necessarily the most recent version. To view the current item, visit http://www.jmir.org/2003/1/e2/ ] Background: LASIK (Laser in Situ Keratomileusis) is a very popular combined surgical and laser procedure, which is used to correct myopia (shortsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness). There is concern that the public is being misled regarding the safety of the procedure. very popular combined surgical and laser procedure, which is used to correct myopia (shortsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness). There is concern that the public is being misled regarding the safety of the procedure. Objectives: To assess the quality and quantity of the information on complications on LASIK Web sites. information on complications on LASIK Web sites. Method: Serial analysis and evaluation of the authorship, content, and technical quality of the information on the complications of LASIK on 21 Web sites. content, and technical quality of the information on the complications of LASIK on 21 Web sites. Results: Of the 21 LASIK Web sites visited, 17 were commercial. Of the 21 Web sites, 5 (24%) had no information on complications. Of the 16 sites that had information on complications the author of the information was clearly identified in 5 (31%), the content was only referenced in 2 (12.5%), and evidence of the information having been updated was only seen in 2 (12.5%). The quantity of information is generally minimal and the information itself is generally difficult to understand and locate. commercial. Of the 21 Web sites, 5 (24%) had no information on complications. Of the 16 sites that had information on complications the author of the information was clearly identified in 5 (31%), the content was only referenced in 2 (12.5%), and evidence of the information having been updated was only seen in 2 (12.5%). The quantity of information is generally minimal and the information itself is generally difficult to understand and locate. Conclusions: The quality and quantity of the information on the Web on the complications of LASIK are poor. More work is required to encourage clear, accurate, up-to-date, clearly authored, and well-referenced, balanced ophthalmic information. on the Web on the complications of LASIK are poor. More work is required to encourage clear, accurate, up-to-date, clearly authored, and well-referenced, balanced ophthalmic information.
Description: Reviewer: Kuchenbecker, J
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4652
ISSN: 1438-8871
Other Identifiers: doi:10.2196/jmir.5.1.e2
Rights: Copyright (cc) Retained by author(s) under a Creative Commons License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Appears in Collections:Volume 5 (2003)

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