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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Journal of Medical Internet Research >
Volume 5 (2003) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4662


Title: SARS and Population Health Technology
Authors: Eysenbach, Gunther
Keywords: Editorial
Severe acute respiratory syndrome
communicable diseases, emerging
epidemiology
Internet
public health
information dissemination, Internet
computer communication networks
bioterrorism
Issue Date: 30-Jun-2003
Publisher: Gunther Eysenbach; Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, Toronto, Canada
Citation: Gunther Eysenbach. SARS and Population Health Technology. J Med Internet Res 2003;5(2):e14 <URL: http://www.jmir.org/2003/2/e14/>
Abstract: [This item is a preserved copy and is not necessarily the most recent version. To view the current item, visit http://www.jmir.org/2003/2/e14/ ] : The recent global outbreak of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) provides an opportunity to study the use and impact of public health informatics and population health technology to detect and fight a global epidemic. Population health technology is the umbrella term for technology applications that have a population focus and the potential to improve public health. This includes the Internet, but also other technologies such as wireless devices, mobile phones, smart appliances, or smart homes. In the context of an outbreak or bioterrorism attack, such technologies may help to gather intelligence and detect diseases early, and communicate and exchange information electronically worldwide. Some of the technologies brought forward during the SARS epidemic may have been primarily motivated by marketing efforts, or were more directed towards reassuring people that "something is being done," ie, fighting an "epidemic of fear." To understand "fear epidemiology" is important because early warning systems monitoring data from a large number of people may not be able to discriminate between a biological epidemic and an epidemic of fear. The need for critical evaluation of all of these technologies is stressed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4662
ISSN: 1438-8871
Other Identifiers: doi:10.2196/jmir.5.2.e14
Rights: Copyright (cc) Retained by author(s) under a Creative Commons License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Appears in Collections:Volume 5 (2003)

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