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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4746

Title: Childbirth Practices, Medical Intervention & Women’s Autonomy: Safer Childbirth or Bigger Profits?
Authors: Baker, Maureen,
Keywords: CHILDBIRTH
CAESAREANS
BREASTFEEDING
COMPARATIVE FAMILY POLICY
MEDICAL INTERVENTION
WOMEN
Issue Date: Dec-2005
Publisher: Pristine Publishing
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life. 4(2):27-43
Abstract: Medical intervention in childbirth is rising in most Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, with the steady increase in caesarean deliveries particularly controversial with the World Health Organisation. Mindful of international guidelines on childbirth issues as well as rising medical costs, states have urged health care institutions to use midwife care for ‘normal’ pregnancies, to shorten hospital stays, and to limit the use of unnecessary technology in childbirth. However, efforts to reform reproductive and maternity services have not always been successful, antagonizing both professionals and women. Based on a larger project about the impact of globalization on family policies, this article demonstrates that international organizations as well as national governments continue to encourage safe childbirth with a minimum of technological interventions and breastfeeding breaks for employed mothers. However, other factors influence childbirth and breastfeeding practices, such as new technologies, changing labour markets, medical and corporate profits and the politics of choice. Childbirth practices are converging cross-nationally, but not necessarily in the direction approved by national governments or international health and labour organizations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/4746
ISSN: 1499-0369
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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