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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/500

Title: Limitations of far infrared thermal imaging in locating birds
Authors: Boonstra, Rudy
Eadie, J. M.
Krebs, Charles
Boutin, S.
Issue Date: 1995
Publisher: Association of Field Ornithologists
Citation: J. Field Ornithol., 66(2):192-198
Abstract: Abstract.-The utility of far infrared (FIR) thermal imaging devices to detect and census birds in the field was examined. A Thermovision 210 was used to survey individuals and/or nests of Great-horned Owls (Bubo virginianus), Pileated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus), Northern Flickers (Colapts auratus), Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica) , Burneheads (Bucephala albeola), Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca), Lapland Longspurs (Calcarius lapponicus) and Pectoral Sandpipers (Erolia melanotos). Thermal imaging was successful in determining activity at nests of all four cavity-nesting species and in finding nests of Arctic tundra birds if their approximate location was known. FIR thermal imaging was not useful, however, in detecting the active, open nests of Mallards or Green-winged Teal, nor was it useful in locating resting waterfowl or Great-horned Owls. It was successful at locating Arctic tundra birds. These differences are largely attributable to variation among species in the insulative property of nests or feathers. It is concluded that FIR imaging will be of limited utility in censusing most avian populations, although it may provide a useful, abeit expensive tool, to assess nest occupancy of cavity- or burrow-nesting birds, or to determine the activity of birds in open habitats.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/500
Appears in Collections:Biology

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