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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/5065

Title: KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND BELIEFS ABOUT EPILEPSY AMONG ADULTS IN A NORTHERN NIGERIAN URBAN COMMUNITY
Authors: Kabir, M.
Iliyasu, Z.
Abubakar, I. S.
Kabir, Z. S.
Farinyaro, A. U.
Keywords: Knowledge, attitude, beliefs, Epilepsy
La connaissance, attitude, croyance, épilepsie
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2005
Publisher: Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto and Annals of African Medicine Society
Citation: Annals of African Medicine (ISSN: 1596-3519) Vol 4 Num 3
Abstract: Background: This study was designed to examine the knowledge, attitude and beliefs about causes, manifestations and treatment of epilepsy among adults in a northern Nigerian urban community. Methods: A cross sectional study design was used. A pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 200 adults residing in Gyadi Gyadi quarters of Kano metropolis, northern Nigeria. Results: Majority of the respondents (39.0%) mentioned that epilepsy is manifested by convulsions. Other manifestations of the disorder proffered by the respondents included falling down (36.0%), rolling of eyes (11.3%) and foaming of mouth (10.3%). Up to 25.2% of respondents did not know the cause of epilepsy. Heredity was identified as a cause of the disorder by (19.9 %), followed by brain injury (19.2%), possession by evil spirits (16.3%) and brain infection (11.7%). Overall (n=52, 26%) of the respondents had good knowledge of epilepsy whereas (n=62, 31%) and (n=86, 43%) had fair and poor knowledge of the disease respectively. Majority of respondents (47.0%) opted for spiritual healing. This was followed by orthodox medical care (34.0%) and the use of traditional herbal medicines (19.0%). Majority of respondents harboured positive attitudes such as tolerance, kindness and sympathy towards epileptics. Literate respondents were more likely to exhibit positive feelings towards epileptics when compared to non-literate subjects (χ2 = 31.5 df = 1 P< 0.001). Conclusions: The low level of knowledge and misconceptions demonstrates the need for community educational programmes aimed at demystifying epilepsy with a view to allaying fears and mistrust about the disease as well as lessen stigmatization toward epileptics.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/5065
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=am05028
Rights: Copyright 2005 - Annals of African Medicine
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

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