test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
University of Toronto at Scarborough >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/5182

Title: α - Amylase activity in the saliva and plasma of habitual alcohol drinkers
Authors: Onyesom, Innocent
Erude, Hope O.
Keywords: α-amylase, saliva, alcohol, Urhobo
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2004
Publisher: Nigerian Society for Experimental Biology
Citation: Biokemistri (ISSN: 0795-8080) Vol 16 Num 1
Abstract: This study reports on the influence of habitual alcohol drinking on α-amylase activity in individuals yet to manifest any physical or clinical sign associated with such drinking habit. α-Amylase activity was determined in saliva and plasma samples from randomly selected volunteers. Twenty-five male heavy drinkers and equivalent number of sex, age and weight-matched non-drinkers, all in apparent good health were enlisted for the study after obtaining their consent. Mean α-amylase activity in saliva and plasma was significantly higher (p<0.05) in habitual drinkers (185.0±6.0 IU/L; 113.5 ± 4.0 IU/L) than in non-drinking controls (144.0 ± 8.0 IU/L; 72.5±3.5 IU/L). Significant increase in both saliva and plasma α-amylase activity could be used in the early diagnosis of heavy alcohol drinking.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/5182
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=bk04002
Rights: Copyright 2004 - Nigerian Society for Experimental Biology
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
bk04002.pdf99.82 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft