test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
University of Toronto at Scarborough >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/5390

Title: ROLE OF SYMBIOTIC SOIL FUNGI IN CONTROLING ROAD SIDE EROSION AND IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF PLANT COMMUNITIES
Authors: Nasim, Ghazala
Keywords: mycorrhizal fungi, plant ecology, erosion.
fungos micorrízicos, ecologia vegetal, erosão.
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2005
Publisher: Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul
Citation: Caderno de Pesquisa série Biologia (ISSN: 1677-5600) Vol 17 Num 1
Abstract: Mycorrhizal fungi are an important component of the rhizosphere of a vast majority of plants. The fungi form mutually beneficial relationship with the roots of these plants. These associations are often obligatory but can be facultative. The benefits conferred to host plants are Increased nutrient (minerals, etc.) uptake, e.g., Phosphorus, Potassium, etc.), increased water availability, Increased tolerance to pH and temperature, growth factors (from fungus) enhances / influences root development, Increased longevity of feeder roots, better rhizosphere development and protection of feeder roots from pathogen. The benefits to mycobiont are carbohydrate food for fungus in most cases (exception orchid mycorrhizae), plant roots release /secrete vitamins (thiamine, etc.) and "Factors"-stimulate spore germination & hyphal growth. Four different stands in the Nothern areas of Pakistan were sampled and analysed using simple ecological methods. The stands sampled were situated in Nalter and Astore, Gilgit. The stands included undisturbed natural vegetation stands and disturbed stands. The disturbed stands were characterized by excessive cutting and felling of trees and overgrazing leading to entirely changed picture of the plant communities and associated mycoflora. For mycological studies the roots of plants of the above mentioned stands along with the rhizosphere soil were sampled and processed. It was recorded that the types of ectomycorrhizal fungi varied as the forest stands matured. The fungi almost trend to disappear when the forest trees are cut. The number of root tips with ectomycorrhizae decreased when the stands were disturbed. So was the case with vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza forming endogonaceous spores number. The weight of water stable aggregates also reduced in the soils of disturbed stands. These disastrous situations then end up with removal of rest of the forest vegetation and excessive erosion or removal of top fertile soil. This can be avoided with proper management of these fungi.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/5390
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=cp05012
Rights: Copyright 2005 - Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
cp05012.pdf130.96 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft