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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/6245

Title: Salmonella intestinal perforation: (27 perforations in one patient, 14 perforations in another) Are the goal posts changing?
Authors: Adeniran, J.O.
Taiwo, J.O.
Abdur-Rahman, L.O.
Keywords: Typhoid, Ileum, Perforation, Colon, Salmonella
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2005
Publisher: Medknow Publications on behalf of the Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
Citation: Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons (ISSN: 0971-9261) Vol 10 Num 4
Abstract: The pathology of salmonellosis after a faeco-oral transmission was first clearly described by Jenner in 1850. Over the years, the pathological manifestations in different tissues of the body have been described. The ileum is however mostly involved leading to enlarged Peyer′s patches, ulceration, and sometimes bleeding and perforation. Efforts at control have largely been improvement in public water supply, safe disposal of waste, and general public health measures. Despite these measures, intestinal perforation from salmonellosis remains the commonest cause of emergency operation in children above 3 years. The incidence continues to rise, so also the mortality, despite new antibiotics and improvement in facilities in the hospitals. Even more disturbing is that we now see more perforations per patient, and more involvement of the colon. Three recently managed patients with multiple ileal/colonic perforations were reviewed. Presenting problems, delay in referral, choice of antibiotics and postoperative complications were noted. One patient had 27 perforations and another 14 perforations. Both survived. Is salmonella changing? Are our patients changing? Is the environment changing? Are the goal posts changing? This article details our recent experience with this dreadful disease, reviews the new literature and makes suggestions for the way forwards.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/6245
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=ip05058
Rights: Copyright 2005 Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons.
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

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