test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
University of Toronto at Scarborough >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/6627

Title: Full Length Research Paper - Studies on the effect of abattior and industrial effluents on the heavy metals and microbial quality of Aba river in Nigeria
Authors: Ezeronye, O. U.
Ubalua, A. O.
Keywords: Waste assimilation, effluent, low level metals, pollution
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2005
Publisher: Academic Journals
Citation: African Journal of Biotechnology (ISSN: 1684-5315) Vol 4 Num 3
Abstract: Levels of lead, iron, zinc, copper, arsenic, cobalt, chromium, manganese, mercury and cadmium, as well as the microbial profile were determined in water samples from Aba River. Physico-chemical examinations revealed that manganese (0.03 mg/l), zinc (4.81 mg/l) and copper (0.19 mg/l) were below the maximum allowable levels set by the United States Environment Protection Agency (USEPA), while lead (0.064 mg/l), iron (0.81 mg/l), arsenic (0.1 mg/l) chromium (0.006 mg/l) and mercury (0.009 mg/l) were high but not significantly. The implication is that waste assimilation capacity of the river is high, a phenomenon attributable to dilution, sedimentation and depuration. Quantitative examinations of the microorganisms present revealed that as many as 2.05 x 108 viable bacterial (cfu/ml) were present. The predominant bacterial forms include Staphylococcus species, Streptococcus faecalis , Escherichia coli , Salmonella species, Bacillus and Clostridium species implying that the abattoir wastes discharged into the river may have had a significant impact on the river ecosystem.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/6627
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=jb05050
Rights: Copyright 2005 - Academic Journals
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
jb05050.pdf101.48 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft