test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
University of Toronto at Scarborough >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >
Bioline International Legacy Collection >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/7000

Title: Surgical wound infection in clean-contaminated and contaminated laparotomy wounds at Muhimbili National Hospital.
Authors: Ussiri, E. V.
Mkony, C. A.
Aziz, M. R.
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2005
Publisher: Association of Surgeons of East Africa and College of Surgeons of East Central and Southern Africa
Citation: East and Central African Journal of Surgery (ISSN: 1024-297X) Vol 10 Num 2
Abstract: Background: Surgical wound (site) infection is the commonest complication following laparotomy for clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations. Good surgical technique and perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations contribute to the low rate of surgical wound infection and its complications. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and complications of surgical wound infection following laparotomy for clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations at Muhimbili National Hospital. Methods: This was a prospective descriptive study done over a period of nine months from January 2001. The study population included patients assessed to have clean-contaminated and contaminated laparotomy wounds Results: The study revealed that surgical wound infection was the commonest complication accounting for 15.6%. Other complications include mortality rate of 8.9% and wound dehiscence (1.1%). Conclusion: It was concluded that another study is required in order to determine the cost of surgical wound infection in this hospital that is in transition towards cost-sharing and health management reform. Also, a long follow up study is required to determine the prevalence of incisional hernia in these wounds.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/7000
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=js05024
Rights: Copyright 2005 - East and Central African Journal of Surgery
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
js05024.pdf68.83 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft