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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/712

Title: More than making it: an analysis of factors that enhance the social functioning of female single-parents.
Authors: Sev'er, Aysan
Pirie, Marion
Issue Date: 1991
Citation: Family Perspective 25(2): 83-96
Abstract: This paper explores the post-divorce functioning of single female family heads. The main thesis here is that by reconceptualizing divorce as a social transition rather than as a crisis "event", we may develop models which address a broader spectrum of variables associated with divorce. The study utilized a correlational analysis of a number of variable clusters: socioeconomic, marital, and network and their influence on perceived functioning. The major findings were that far from perceiving divorce in exclusively negative terms, many women in our sample also reported very positive aspects of post-divorce functioning, particularly around a newfound sense of self confidence, autonomy, and personal control. This finding has important implications for both researchers who may tend to circumscribe their view of divorce as an essentially negative process, and for practitioners who may be able to utilize this information in their counselling of post-divorce single mothers through recourse to reframing techniques, self esteem counselling, and group facilitation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/712
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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