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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/714

Title: Mate selection patterns of men and women in personal advertisements: new Bottle, old wine.
Authors: Sev'er, Aysan
Keywords: mate selection, homogamy, mate markets, traditional mate selection
Issue Date: 1990
Citation: Atlantis: A Women's Studies Journal Vol. 15(2): 70-76
Abstract: In the present paper, mate markets were conceptualized under old fashioned, traditional and modern typologies. The structural changes in the society were suggested to lead to changes in the type of the mate market. Personal advertisements in the newspapers were considered to fall under modern mate markets. Between 1975 and 1985, 1,298 advertisements in a metropolitan newspaper were analyzed. The five-fold increase across the decade was interpreted as a shift toward modernization. However, the criteria utilized by individuals in selecting their mates, especially in terms of age, race and marital status showed a continued reliance on traditional patterns. Female and male advertisers substantially differed, both in terms of frequencies and the bargaining tools they utilized. It was concluded that in spite of the change in the form of the market, the rules of mate selection remain traditional and favour males, whites, singles and the young.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/714
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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