test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
University of Toronto at Scarborough >
Biological Sciences >
Biology >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/729

Title: Peripheral O2 chemoreceptors mediate humoral catecholamine secretion from fish chromaffin cells
Authors: Reid, Stephen
Perry, Steve
Keywords: epinephrine; cardiorespiratory reflexes; gills; hypoxia; Oncorhynchus mykiss
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: American Physiology Society
Citation: Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol. 284: R990-R999, 2003
Abstract: This study addressed the hypothesis that the secretion of catecholamines from trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) chromaffin cells, during hypoxia, is triggered by stimulation of O2 chemoreceptors located within the gills. Sodium cyanide was administered into the inspired water (external cyanide) or injected into the gill circulation (internal cyanide) to pharmacologically stimulate external (water sensing) or internal (blood sensing) O2 chemoreceptors, respectively. Both of these treatments caused an elevation of circulating catecholamine levels. The response to external, but not internal, cyanide was abolished by removal of the first gill arch. Hypoxia produced an increase in circulating catecholamine levels that was unaffected by removal of the first gill arch or by denervation of the pseudobranch. Cyanide and hypoxia both caused the well-documented cardiorespiratory reflexes normally observed in this species. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that gill O2 chemoreceptors can initiate the reflex that leads to catecholamine release from the chromaffin cells and that stimulation of internally oriented O2 receptors on all gill arches appears to be the physiologically important mechanism for initiating release.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/729
Appears in Collections:Biology

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
peripheral_o2_chemoreceptors_mediate_humoral.pdf166.29 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft