THE 1962-1963 REPRESENTATIVE POETRY EDITION

BY IAN LANCASHIRE

MARCH 2001


Indexes: [ by Poet | by Title | by First Line | by Keyword | Timeline | Calendar | Introduction | Glossary of poetic terms and forms | Criticism on poetry | Canadian Poetry | the RPO Edition ]

Representative Poetry On-line
Editor, I. Lancashire; Publisher
Web Development Group, Information Technology Services
University of Toronto Library 2001.


Representative Poetry Prepared by members of the Department of English at the University of Toronto. VOLUME I. Third Edition. University of Toronto Press, 1962. [Teaching copy of Ian Lancashire]

Prefatory Note

Although this new edition of Representative Poetry differs in some respects from its predecessors, it can, we hope, be considered as the most recent embodiment of a sound and relatively long-established tradition. For a good part of the century during which English literature has been offered as a subject of study at the University of Toronto (since 1853, to be exact) it has been the custom of the Department of English to prepare its own anthology of poetry for the use of students, particularly in the pass (now the general) course. With changing requirements of the curriculum, the anthology has grown from a single volume for first-year students to two large volumes, and now to three, each representing the requirements of a year in the course. As in past editions, the selections are primarily, but by no means exclusively, based upon the curriculum; it has been the intention of the editors to provide generous enough selections to allow flexibility in prescription and also to make the work a reasonably satisfactory general anthology.

In this edition, the removal of poetry of the Middle English period, and the division into three volumes, have allowed a considerable extension in the representation of major poets. Some of the minor poets have been removed, or restricted to pieces of particular historical or literary importance. The texts have been completely re-edited, and the main effort has in fact been devoted to the provision of good texts, that is, of texts which represent as closely as possible their authors' intention. The aim has therefore been not to depart in substantial readings from the original texts of greatest authority, whether printed or manuscript, unless there seemed to be strong grounds for emendation. However, the text has been modernized in spelling, or punctuation, or both except in the case of Spenser and for a few words left in Milton's distinctive spelling (e.g., highth and sovran); as earlier editors of Representative Poetry have pointed out, no system of modernization can be completely satisfactory and consistent when several centuries are involved -- our aim, like theirs, has been a minimum of change thought advantageous for the ordinary reader."

Dates of publication are given at the foot of each poem; students should consult the notes for fuller information. The principle followed in the notes is that of the earlier editors: to provide the essential minimum, rather than the elaborate maximum. The notes offer no critical commentary, no explanation of words to be found in an ordinary dictionary. The degree of annotation necessarily varies from author to author, and no attempt has been made to impose upon editors a wholly artificial uniformity.

These volumes have been very much a co-operative effort of the Department of English, and any excellence they may have is due, not to the General Editors, but to the members of the Department who made themselves responsible for text and notes for particular authors. For this first volume, Millar MacLure provided the text and notes for Spenser, F. D. Hoeniger for the other sixteenth-century poets and Jonson, N. J. Endicott for Donne and the seventeenth-century poets, A. S. P. Woodhouse and Hugh MacCallum for Milton. Mr. Hoeniger bore the major burden of the general editing of the volume.

Not only for the attractive layout but also for frequent editorial advice, ably and patiently given, we owe gratitude to the University of Toronto, Press and especially to its editor, Miss F. G. Halpenny.

Toronto, August 1962

F.E.L.P., General Editor
F.D.H., Assoc. Gen. Editor
(for the Department of English)


Representative Poetry Prepared by members of the Department of English at the University of Toronto. VOLUME II. Third Edition. University of Toronto Press, 1963. [Owned by Ian Lancashire; formerly owned by Eric Wright]

Prefatory Note

Although this new edition of Representative Poetry differs in some respects from its predecessors, it can, we hope, be considered as the most recent embodiment of a sound and relatively long-established tradition. For a good part of the century during which English literature has been offered as a subject of study at the University of Toronto (since 1853, to be exact) it has been the custom of the Department of English to prepare its own anthology of poetry for the use of students, particularly in the pass (now the general) course. With changing requirements of the curriculum, the anthology has grown from a single volume for first-year students to two large volumes, and now to three, each representing the requirements of a year in the course. As in past editions, the selections are primarily, but by no means exclusively, based upon the curriculum; it has been the intention of the editors to provide generous enough selections to allow flexibility in prescription and also to make the work a reasonably satisfactory general anthology.

In this edition, the removal of poetry of the Middle.English period, and the division into three volumes, have allowed a considerable extension in the representation of major poets. Some of the minor poets have been removed, or restricted to pieces of particular historical or literary importance. The texts have been completely re-edited, and the main effort has in fact been devoted to the provision of good texts, that is, of texts which represent as closely as possible their authors' intention. The aim has therefore been not to depart in substantial readings from the original texts of greatest authority, whether printed or manuscript, unless there seemed to be strong grounds for emendation. However, the text has been modernized in spelling, or punctuation, or both except in the case of Spenser; as earlier editors of Representative Poetry have pointed out, no system of modernization can be completely satisfactory and consistent when several centuries are involved -- our aim, like theirs, has been "a minimum of change thought advantageous for the ordinary reader."

Dates of publication are given at the foot of each poem; students should consult the notes for fuller information. The principle followed in the notes is that of the earlier editors: to provide the essential minimum, rather than the elaborate maximum. The notes offer no critical commentary, no explanation of words to be found in an ordinary dictionary. The degree of annotation necessarily varies from author to author, and no attempt has been made to impose upon editors a wholly artificial uniformity.

These volumes have been very much a co-operative effort of the Department of English, and any excellence they may have is due, not to the General Editors, but to the members of the Department who made themselves responsible for text and notes for particular authors. For this second volume, Douglas Grant and F. E. L. Priestley provided the text and notes for Dryden, D. F. Theall for Pope, G. G. Falle for minor Restoration and eighteenth-century poets, Northrop Frye for Smart and Blake, J. R. MacGillivray for Wordsworth and Keats, P. F. Morgan for Scott, Kathleen Coburn and R. S. Woof for Coleridge, M. T. Wilson for Byron and Shelley, and O. H. T. Rudzik for Clare.

The Editors are grateful for the assistance of the Editorial Department of the University of Toronto Press and especially to Eleanor Cook.

Toronto, August 1962

F.E.L.P., General Editor F.D.H., Assoc. Gen. Editor (for the Department of English)


Representative Poetry Prepared by members of the Department of English at the University of Toronto. VOLUME III. Third Edition. University of Toronto Press, 1963. [Owned by Ian Lancashire; formerly owned by Eric Wright]

Prefatory Note

Although this new edition of Representative Poetry differs in some respects from its predecessors, it can, we hope, be considered as the most recent embodiment of a sound and relatively long-established tradition. For a good part of the century during which English literature has been offered as a subject of study at the University of Toronto (since 1853, to be exact) it has been the custom of the Department of English to prepare its own anthology of poetry for the use of students, particularly in the pass (now the general) course. With changing requirements of the curriculum, the anthology has grown from a single volume for first-year students to two large volumes, and now to three, each representing the requirements of a year in the course. As in past editions, the selections are primarily, but by no means exclusively, based on the curriculum; it has been the intention of the editors to provide generous enough selections to allow flexibility in prescription and also to make the work a reasonably satisfactory general anthology.

In this edition, the removal of poetry of the Middle English period, and the division into three volumes, have allowed a considerable extension in the representation of major poets. Some of the minor poets have been removed, or restricted to pieces of particular historical or literary importance. The texts have been completely re-edited, and the main effort has in fact been devoted to the provision of good texts, that is, of texts which represent as closely as possible their authors' intention. The aim has therefore been not to depart in substantial readings from the original texts of greatest authority, whether printed or manuscript, unless there seemed to be strong grounds for emendation. However, the text has been modernized in spelling, or punctuation, or both except in the case of Spenser; as earlier editors of Representative Poetry have pointed out, no system of modernization can be completely satisfactory and consistent when several centuries are involved -- our aim, like theirs, has been "a minimum of change thought advantageous for the ordinary reader."

Dates of publication are given at the foot of each poem; students should consult the notes for fuller information. The principle followed in the notes is that of the earlier editors: to provide the essential minimum, rather than the elaborate maximum. The notes offer no critical commentary, no explanation of words to be found in an ordinary dictionary. The degree of annotation necessarily varies from author to author, and no attempt has been made to impose upon editors a wholly artificial uniformity.

These volumes have been very much a co-operative effort of the Department of English, and any excellence they may have is due, not to the General Editors, but to the members of the Department who made themselves responsible for text and notes for particular authors. In this volume, text and notes for FitzGerald, Clough, and the Rossettis were prepared by Sister St. Francis; for Tennyson by H. M. McLuhan; for Browning by F. E. L. Priestley; for Arnold and Meredith by H. Kerpneck; and for Landor, Morris, and Swinburne by P. F. Morgan.

The Editors are grateful for the assistance of the Editorial Department of the University of Toronto Press.

F.E.L.P., General Editor
F.D.H.. Assoc. Gen. Editor
(for the Department of English)

Toronto, August 1961