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Selected Poetry of Frederick George Scott (1861-1944)


from Representative Poetry On-line
Prepared by members of the Department of English at the University of Toronto
from 1912 to the present and published by the University of Toronto Press from 1912 to 1967.
RPO Edited by Ian Lancashire
A UTEL (University of Toronto English Library) Edition
Published by the Web Development Group, Information Technology Services, University of Toronto Libraries
© 2003, Ian Lancashire for the Department of English, University of Toronto

Index to poems

`How slayeth Sin?' First, God is hid,
And the heart within
By its own self chid;
Then the maddened brain
Is scourged by pain
To sin as before
And more and more,
For evermore.
        (The Sting of Death, 25-33)
  1. The Burden of Time
  2. The Feud
  3. Samson
  4. The Sting of Death
  5. The Unnamed Lake


Notes on Life and Works

Frederick George Scott, known as "the poet of the Laurentians," was born in Montreal in 1861 and educated at Bishop's College, Lennoxville (B.A., 1881), and King's College, London (M.A., 1884). Made an Anglican priest in 1886, he become rector of St. Matthew's Church in Quebec city. He published 13 books of poetry in his lifetime: Justin and Other Poems (1885), The Soul's Quest and Other Poems (1888), My Lattice and Other Poems (1894), The Unnamed Lake and Other Poems (1897), Poems Old and New (1900), A Hymn of Empire and Other Poems (1906), Poems (1910), The Gates of Time, and Other Poems (1915), In the Battle Silences: Poems Written at the Front (1916), In Sun and Shade: A Book of Verse (1926), New Poems (1929), Selected Poems (1933), and Collected Poems (1934). During the first world war Scott served as chaplain to the Canadian First Division and published his experiences in The Great War as I Saw It (1922). He died in 1944, leaving a daughter and four sons, one of whom, F. R. Scott, was a poet like his father.

Biographical information

Given name: Frederick George
Family name: Scott
Birth date: 1861
Death date: 1944
Nationality: Canadian